Deal: Get these great Noodlecake games for just $0.89 each at Google Play Store

You still have just over five days left to pick up a handful of mobile games from Noodlecake Studios in Humble Bundle’s Indie Hits collection, but if there’s a particular game you’re after from the publisher then you might be in luck!

The Canadian studio has slashed the price of some of its most popular titles and two classic PC ports over on the Google Play Store to celebrate the holidays (thanks, Droid Gamers). Let’s see what’s on offer, shall we?

Android TV users will be crazy to miss out on Alto’s Adventure TV – a gorgeous physics-based snowboarding game that, like all of the games on this list, is on sale for just $0.99. There’s also The Bug Butcher for shooter fans and Caterzillar for those who like platformers with a sticky twist.

Editor’s Pick

The roguelike action adventure Wayward Souls is also on offer alongside the wonderfully bonkers Death Road to Canada – a “Randomly Generated Road Trip Action-RPG” in which you do battle with hordes of flesh-craving zombies.

If you’re as old as I am, you might remember the puzzle adventure series, Myst. The early 1990s Mac/PC classic had you moving through stunningly realized pre-rendered backdrops and solving mysteries with point-and-click style gameplay.

The original Myst and its direct sequel, Riven, have stood the test of time incredibly well and Noodlecake and developer Cyan’s mobile ports of both games are absolutely worth checking out if you’re into games like The Room or Monument Valley. Both are available for $0.89 each.

You can grab the savings over at the Google Play Store via the links below:

  • Alto’s Adventure TV
  • The Bug Butcher
  • Caterzillar
  • Death Road to Canada
  • RealMyst
  • Riven : The sequel to Myst
  • Wayward Souls

Will you be picking up any of the games on offer? Let us know in the comments.

Trump Is Really Trying to Set the World on Fire

And the whole world burns.

“I’ve just heard that my family home near Carpenteria is literally in flames at this moment,” a friend told me recently. She was particularly worried, she said, because “my mom has MS. She and my dad got the call to evacuate after midnight last night. They were able to grab a few photos, my sister’s childhood teddy bear, and the dog. That’s it. That’s all that’s left.”

My friend’s parents are among the thousands of victims of the 240,000-acre Thomas fire, one of California’s spate of late-season wildfires. Stoked by 80-mile-an-hour Santa Ana winds, plenty of dry fuel, and 8% humidity, such fires are devouring huge swaths of southern California from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara. Months of dry weather and unseasonably warm temperatures have turned the southern part of the state into a tinderbox.

Once again the country watches in horror as firefighters struggle to contain blazes of historic voracity — as we watched only a couple of months ago when at least 250 wildfires spread across the counties north of San Francisco. Even after long-awaited rains brought by an El Niño winter earlier in 2017, years of drought have left my state ready to explode in flames on an increasingly warming planet. All it takes is a spark.

Sort of like the whole world in the age of Donald Trump.

Torching Jerusalem

The crazy comes so fast and furious these days, it’s easy to forget some of the smaller brushfires — like the one President Trump lit at the end of November when he retweeted three false and “inflammatory” videos about Muslims that he found on the Twitter feed of the leader of a British ultra-nationalist group.

The president’s next move in the international arena — his “recognition” of Jerusalem as the capital of the state of Israel — hasn’t yet slipped from memory, in part because of the outrage it evoked around the world. As Moustafa Bayoumi, acclaimed author of How Does It Feel to be a Problem? Being Young and Arab in America, wrote in the Guardian, “The entire Middle East, from Palestine to Yemen, appears set to burst into flames after this week.” Not surprisingly, his prediction has already begun to come true with demonstrations in the West Bank, Gaza, and Lebanon, where U.S. flags and posters of President Trump were set alight. We’ve also seen the first rockets fired from Gaza into Israel and the predictable reprisal Israeli air attacks.

Trump’s Jerusalem announcement comes as his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, pursues his so-called Middle East peace initiative. Kushner’s new BFF is Mohammed bin Salman, the heir apparent to the Saudi throne. We don’t know just what the two of them talked about during a late night tête-à-tête as October ended, but it probably involved Salman’s plans to jail hundreds of prominent Saudis, including 11 fellow princes. They undoubtedly also discussed a new, incendiary Israeli-Palestinian “peace plan” that the U.S. and Saudi Arabia are reportedly quietly circulating.

Under this proposal, according to the New York Times, “The Palestinians would get a state of their own but only noncontiguous parts of the West Bank and only limited sovereignty over their own territory. The vast majority of Israeli settlements in the West Bank, which most of the world considers illegal, would remain. The Palestinians would not be given East Jerusalem as their capital and there would be no right of return for Palestinian refugees and their descendants.”

If this is the “deal of the century” that President Trump plans to roll out, then it’s no surprise that he’d prepare the way by announcing his plans to move the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem.

That move reveals a lot about Trump’s much vaunted deal-making skills when it comes to the international arena.  Here he has made a major concession to Israel without receiving a thing in return, except words of praise from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (and from evangelicals in this country). Given that Israel came into possession of the eastern half of Jerusalem through military conquest in 1967, a method of acquiring territory that international law views as illegal, it was quite a concession. The ultimate status of Jersalem is supposed to be a subject for the final stage of Palestinian-Israeli negotiations, not a gift to one side before the talks even begin.

Behind this concession, as far as can be seen, lies no strategic intent of any sort, not in the Middle East at least. In fact, President Trump was perfectly clear about just why he was making the announcement: to distinguish himself from his predecessors. (That is, to make himself feel good.) “While previous presidents have made [moving the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem] a major campaign promise, they failed to deliver. Today, I am delivering.”

“Some say,” he added, that his predecessors failed because “they lacked courage.” In point of fact, Trump did not exactly “deliver” either. Just like his predecessors, he promptly signed a semi-annual waiver that once again delayed the actual embassy move for six months.

Pyromania?

Rather than serving a larger Middle East strategy, Trump’s Jerusalem announcement served mainly his own ego. It gave him the usual warm bath of adulation from his base and another burst of the pleasure he derives from seeing his name in the headlines.

In his daily behavior, in fact, Trump acts less like a shrewd dealmaker than a child with pyromania, one who relieves anxiety and draws attention by starting fires. How else to explain his tendency every time there’s a lull in the coverage of him, to post something incendiary on Twitter? Each time, just imagine him striking another match, lighting another fuse, and then sitting back to watch the pyrotechnics.

Here is the grim reality of this American moment: whoever has access to the president also has a good shot at pointing this human flamethrower wherever he or she chooses, whether at “Little Rocket Man” in North Korea or Doug Jones in Alabama (although that flame turned out to be, as they British say, a damp squib).
The Middle East has hardly been the only part of the world our president has taken visible pleasure in threatening to send up in flames. Consider the situation on the Korean peninsula, which remains the greatest danger the world faces today. Who could forget the way he stoked the already glowing embers of the Korean crisis in August by threatening to rain “fire and fury like the world has never seen” — an obvious nuclear reference — on North Korea? And ever since it’s only gotten worse.  In recent weeks, for instance, not only Trump but his coterie have continued to ramp up the rhetoric against that country. Earlier this month, for instance, National Security Adviser General H.R. McMaster renewed the threat of military action, saying ominously, “There are ways to address this problem short of armed conflict, but it is a race because [North Korean leader Kim Jong-un]’s getting closer and closer [to having a nuclear capacity to hit the United States], and there’s not much time left.”

In September, Trump’s ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, reinforced this message in an interview with CNN. “If North Korea keeps on with this reckless behavior, if the United States has to defend itself or defend its allies in any way, North Korea will be destroyed.”

Indeed, Vipin Narang, a nuclear nonproliferation specialist at MIT, thinks the Trump administration may already have accepted the inevitability of such a war and the near-guarantee that South Korea and Japan will be devastated as well — as long as it comes before North Korea can effectively launch a nuclear strike on the U.S. mainland. “There are a lot of people who argue that there’s still a window to stop North Korea from getting an ICBM with a nuclear warhead to use against the United States,” he commented to the Washington Post. “They’re telling themselves that if they strike now, worst-case scenario: only Japan and South Korea will eat a nuclear weapon.”

You don’t exactly have to be an admirer of Kim Jong-un and his sad outcast regime to imagine why he might be reluctant to relinquish his nuclear arsenal. North Korea remains the designated U.S. enemy in a war that, almost seven decades later, has never officially ended. It’s situated on a peninsula where the most powerful nation in the world holds military exercises twice a year. And Kim has had ample opportunity to observe how Washington has treated other leaders (Saddam Hussein and Muammar Gaddafi) who gave up their nuclear programs. Certainly, threats of fire and fury are not going to make him surrender his arsenal, but they may still make Donald Trump feel like a real commander-in-chief.

Home Fires Burning

It’s not only in the international arena that Trump’s been burning things up. He’s failed — for now — to destroy the Affordable Care Act (though not for lack of striking matches), but the GOP has successfully aimed the Trump flamethrower at any vestiges of progressive taxation at the federal level. And now that the House and Senate are close to reconciling their versions of tax legislation, the Republicans have made it clear just why they’re so delighted to pass a bill that will increase the deficit by $1.5 trillion dollars. It gives them a “reason” to put to flames what still remains of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal of the 1930s and President Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society of the 1960s.

House Speaker Paul Ryan gave a vivid sense of where that presidential flamethrower could be aimed soon when he told radio host Ross Kaminsky, “We’re going to have to get back next year at entitlement reform, which is how you tackle the debt and the deficit.” The goal? Cutting appropriations for Medicare and Medicaid, programs shepherded through Congress in the mid-1960s by Lyndon Johnson. These achievements helped realize his vision of the United States as a Great Society, one that provides for the basic needs of all its citizens.

Meanwhile, when it comes to setting the American social environment on fire, President Trump has already announced his post-tax-bill target du jour: welfare “reform.”
Welfare reform? Not a subject he even mentioned on the campaign trail in 2016, but different people are aiming that flamethrower now. The Hill reports the scene as Trump talked to a group of lawmakers in the Capitol basement:

“Ticking through a number of upcoming legislative priorities, Trump briefly mentioned welfare reform, sources in the room said.

“‘We need to do that. I want to do that,’ Trump told rank-and-file lawmakers in a conference room in the basement of the Capitol. The welfare line got a big applause, with one lawmaker describing it as an ‘off-the-charts’ reception.”

We know that getting “big applause” guarantees that a Trump line will also get repeated.

At a time when “entitlement” has become a dirty word, we’d do well to remember that not so long ago it wasn’t crazy to think that the government existed to help people do collectively what they couldn’t do as individuals. As a friend said to me recently, taxes are a more organized way of crowd-funding human needs.

Who even remembers that ancient time when candidate Trump, not yet an arsonist on the home front, promised to protect Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security? President Trump is a different matter.

It seems likely, however, that at least for now the Republicans won’t push him on Social Security because, as Paul Ryan told the Washington Post’s “Wonkblog,” the Republicans don’t have enough votes to overcome a Senate filibuster and the program is too popular back home for a super-majority of Republicans to go after it.
Why can they pass a tax “reform” bill with only a simple majority, but not Social Security cuts? The tax bill is being rushed through Congress using the “reconciliation” process by which differences in the Senate and House versions are smoothed over to produce a single bill.  This only requires a simple majority to pass in each house. The Senate’s “Byrd Rule,” adopted in 1974, prohibits the use of the reconciliation process to make changes to Social Security. Thank you, former West Virginia senator Robert Byrd!

In addition to the programs that made up Johnson’s “War on Poverty,” he also signed the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Trump’s Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity is already hard at work setting fire to the latter, as the president continues to demand evidence for his absurd claim that he won the popular vote in the 2016 election. He must be having an effect. At least half of all Republicans now seem to believe that he indeed did win that vote.

And before we leave the subject, just a couple of final notes on literal fires in the Trump era. His Department of Transportation has been quietly at work making those more likely, too. In a move supported by fans of train fires everywhere, that department has quietly reversed an Obama-era rule requiring that trains carrying crude oil deploy, as Reuters reports, “an advanced braking system designed to prevent fiery derailments… The requirement to install so-called electronically controlled pneumatic (ECP) brakes was included in a package of safety reforms unveiled by the Obama administration in 2015 in response to a series of deadly derailments that grew out of the U.S. shale boom.”

Government data shows there have been 17 such derailments of trains carrying crude oil or ethanol in the U.S. since 2006.
Then there’s the fire that has probably destroyed my friend’s house in southern California even as I wrote this. Donald Trump can hardly be blamed for that one. The climate in this part of the world has already grown hotter and drier.  We can certainly blame him, however, for turning up the heat on planet Earth by announcing plans to pull the United States out of the 2015 Paris agreement on climate change, overseeing the slashing of tax incentives for alternative energy (amid a bonanza of favors for the fossil fuel industry), and working to assert an oil, gas, and coal version of American “energy dominance” globally.  From the world’s leading economic power, there may be no larger “match” on the planet.  

A Flame of Hope

What hope is there of quenching the Trumpian fires?

There is the fact that much of the world is standing up to him. At this month’s climate accord follow-up meeting in Paris, billionaires Bill Gates and Richard Branson announced “a dozen international projects emerging from the summit that will inject money into efforts to curb climate change.” The head of the World Bank insisted that the institution would stop funding fossil fuel programs within the next two years. Former American officials spoke up, too, as U.S. News & World Report observed:
“One by one, officials including former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, billionaire [and former New York City mayor] Michael Bloomberg, and former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry insisted the world will shift to cleaner fuels and reduce emissions regardless of whether the Trump administration pitches in.

I take comfort, too, in the extraordinary achievements of international civil society. Consider, for example, the work of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), this year’s recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. This summer, as a result of a campaign it led, two-thirds of the world’s nations — 122 of them — signed the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which outlaws the use, production, and possession of nuclear arms. That treaty — and the Nobel that rewarded its organizers — didn’t get a lot of coverage in the United States, perhaps because, predictably, we didn’t sign it.

In fact, none of the existing nuclear powers signed it, but the treaty remains significant nonetheless. We should not underestimate the moral power of international agreements like this one. Few of us remember the 1928 Kellogg-Briand pact, which outlawed recourse to war for the resolution of international disputes. Nevertheless, that treaty formed the basis for the conviction of Nazi war criminals at Nuremberg for their crimes against peace. By implication, the Kellogg-Briand treaty also legalized a whole set of non-military actions nations can now take, including the use of economic sanctions against countries that violate international norms or laws.

ICAN leaders Beatrice Fihn and Setsuko Thurlow (herself a Hiroshima survivor) believe that, over time, the treaty will change how the world thinks about nuclear weapons, transforming them from a necessary evil to an unthinkable one, and so will ultimately lead to their elimination. As Fihn told the BBC’s Stephen Sackur, “If you’re uncomfortable with nuclear weapons under Donald Trump, you’re probably uncomfortable with nuclear weapons” in general. In other words, the idea of Trump’s tiny fingers on the nuclear trigger is enough to start a person wondering whether anybody’s fingers should be on that trigger.

The world’s reaction in Paris and ICAN’s passionate, rational belief in the moral power of international law are like a cool drink of water on a very hot day.
 

 

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RonyaSoft Poster Printer

Just some unsolicited free advertising for a software I bought this weekend: Ronyasoft’s Poster Printer costs $19.95 for a home license. It is a software that takes an image and prints it at any size you want over multiple pages of paper. You can crop the image to print just the part you want. And if you print over multiple pages, you can add helpful guides on how to glue the whole thing together to give a good-looking poster. The software is quite user-friendly and it was easy enough to figure out all the options. And I’m quite happy with the results.

Obviously I am using the software to print out battlemaps for my Dungeons & Dragons campaign. Specifically this weekend I am printing the battlemaps for Madness at Gardmore Abbey. I still had the images from the Cartographer’s Guild from the last time I played. But at the time I thought I’d never play that adventure again, and threw away the printouts, so I had to print them again.

If you followed my posts about battlemaps you might notice that this is somewhere a step back in quality. For my last 4E campaign I didn’t print the poster maps myself, but sent them out to a poster printing website. Great quality, no need to glue pages together, and better water-resistance of the final product makes those poster maps really nice. However they cost between $10 and $20 per map, depending on size. And for Gardmore Abbey I need 24 maps. That’s a bit too expensive for my taste.

In a way there is a difference in the economics of this between 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons and 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. My recent experience with playing 4E adventures in 5E shows that 5E is about three times faster than 4E. Madness at Gardmore Abbey in 4E took my group 18 sessions to play through over a whole year. In 5E I can probably do it in 6 sessions or so. So with a lot less time spent on any single battlemap, I am less willing to spend too much money on one. However I do plan to play the Zeitgeist campaign, which is the only one that I have a complete set of poster maps for, in 5th edition somewhere next year. I’m just waiting for the official conversion.

AniMate bY Javascript : JavaScript

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To make the webpage dynamic we use animation. This animation can be implemented using both CSS and JavaScript. Here’s how to use JavaScript animation in webpage.

How does it work?

The idea behind the JavaScript-based animation is fairly simple, a number of DOM elements (< /img>, < /div > or otherwise) are moved around the page according to some sort of pattern determined by a logical equation or function.
You can use JavaScript to create a complex animation having following elements,
  • Fireworks
  • Fade effect
  • Roll-in or Roll-out
  • Page-in or Page-out
  • Object movement
An existing JavaScript animation library

JavaScript provides the following two functions to be frequently used in animation programs.
  • setTimeout( function, duration) − This function calls function after duration milliseconds from now.
  • setInterval(function, duration) − This function calls function after every durationmilliseconds.
  • clearTimeout(setTimeout_variable) − This function calls clears any timer set by the setTimeout() functions.
JavaScript can also set a number of attributes of a DOM object including its position on the screen. You can set top and left attribute of an object to position it anywhere on the screen. 
 Here is its syntax.

// Set distance from left edge of the screen.
object.style.left = distance in pixels or points;

or

// Set distance from top edge of the screen.
object.style.top = distance in pixels or points;

Manual Animation

We are using the JavaScript function getElementById() to get a DOM object and then assigning it to a global variable imgObj.
We have defined an initialization function init() to initialize imgObj where we have set its position and left attributes.
We are calling initialization function at the time of window load.
Finally, we are calling moveRight() function to increase the left distance by 10 pixels. You could also set it to a negative value to move it to the left side.
Click here to get the code!

function moveRight1(){ var imgObj1 = null; imgObj1 = document.getElementById(‘myImage’); imgObj1.style.position= ‘relative’; imgObj1.style.left = ‘0px’; imgObj1.style.left = parseInt(imgObj1.style.left) + 250 + ‘px’; }


Click button below to move the image to right

Automated Animation

In the above example, we saw how an image moves to right with every click. We can automate this process by using the JavaScript function setTimeout() as follows −
Here we have added more methods. So let’s see what is new here −
  • The moveRight() function is calling setTimeout() function to set the position of imgObj.
  • We have added a new function stop() to clear the timer set by setTimeout() function and to set the object at its initial position.
Click here to get the code!

var imgObj = null; var animate ; function init(){ imgObj = document.getElementById(‘myImage1’); imgObj.style.position= ‘relative’; imgObj.style.left = ‘0px’; } function moveRight(){ imgObj.style.left = parseInt(imgObj.style.left) + 10 + ‘px’; animate = setTimeout(moveRight,20); // call moveRight in 20msec } function stop(){ clearTimeout(animate); imgObj.style.left = ‘0px’; } window.onload =init;


Click the buttons below to handle animation

Rollover with a Mouse Event

Here is a simple example showing image rollover with a mouse event.
Let’s see what we are using in the following example −
  • At the time of loading this page, the ‘if’ statement checks for the existence of the image object. If the image object is unavailable, this block will not be executed.
  • The Image() constructor creates and preloads a new image object called image1.
  • The src property is assigned the name of the external image file called /images/html.gif.
  • Similarly, we have created image2 object and assigned /images/http.gif in this object.
  • The # (hash mark) disables the link so that the browser does not try to go to a URL when clicked. This link is an image.
  • The onMouseOver event handler is triggered when the user’s mouse moves onto the link, and the onMouseOut event handler is triggered when the user’s mouse moves away from the link (image).
  • When the mouse moves over the image, the HTTP image changes from the first image to the second one. When the mouse is moved away from the image, the original image is displayed.
  • When the mouse is moved away from the link, the initial image html.gif will reappear on the screen.

if(document.images){ var image1 = new Image(); // Preload an image image1.src = “https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/741523114278916096/7bL6w5dy.jpg”; var image2 = new Image(); // Preload second image image2.src = “http://suvenconsultants.com/mainpagefiles/images/training.jpg”; }

Move your mouse over the image to see the result:

Click here to get the code!




Learn Web Technologies!


The One Scenario in Which Trump Would Risk Impeachment and Fire Robert Mueller

The president reportedly expects to be exonerated soon.

President Donald Trump believes that special counsel Robert Mueller will soon send him a letter that completely exonerates him of any wrongdoing — but the president’s allies fear that such a letter will never come.

CNN reports that Trump has recently been boasting to allies that the Russia probe will be over very shortly, and that Mueller will personally exonerate him. The president believes this, CNN’s sources say, because his attorneys have tried to manage him by telling him that he faces no real danger from the probe.

However, some of the president’s allies believe this is delusional, wishful thinking — and they fear what Trump will do if that exoneration letter never comes.

One Trump ally tells CNN that the president will likely have a “meltdown” after months go by without an exoneration letter, after which “he’ll try and fire Mueller and then be impeached.”

Another Trump ally similarly warns that Trump’s lawyers are playing a dangerous game by buttering him up with happy talk about the Mueller probe ending shortly.

“I’ve known him long enough to know that disappointing him is a problem and they’ve built up a level of expectations for him that are unrealistic,” the source said. “[They’ve] lulled him into a false sense of security.”

 

 

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Some cool things you can do with Python: pyThOn – fastEst Growing LaNgUage

python logo


Python is an easy to learn, powerful programming language. It has efficient high-level data structures and a simple but effective approach to object-oriented programming. Python’s elegant syntax and dynamic typing, together with its interpreted nature, make it an ideal language for scripting and rapid application development in many areas on most platforms.

Python interpreters are available for many operating systems, allowing Python code to run on a wide variety of systems.
So what are some of the cool things you can do with Python?

1. Python Web Development

python web development


Web development is the umbrella term for conceptualizing, creating, deploying and operating web applications and application programming interfaces for the Web.
Python is object oriented programming language. It can be used to build server-side web applications. Python is not used in a web browser. The language executed in browsers such as Chrome, Firefox and Internet Explorer is JavaScript.
However, most web applications build using a combination of Python and JavaScript. Python is executed on the server side while JavaScript is downloaded to the client and run by the web browser.

So you can build a cool website from scratch without feeling overwhelmed. You can also take advantage of micro-frameworks like Flask and Bottle.

Advanced content management is also possible with systems like Django CMS and Plone. Further, Python’s standard library supports several internet protocols like HTML, XML, and JSON.

2. Scientific and Numeric Computing
Python is an increasingly popular tool for Data Analysis. Data analytics falls under scientific and numeric computing. So we can take advantage of many libraries which python provides for scientific and Numeric computing. Such as SciPy library which includes modules for linear algebra, optimization, integration, special functions, signal and image processing, statistics, genetic algorithms, ODE solvers, and others. Numba which is specifically suited for scientific codes and Pandas is a data analysis and modeling library, so there’s a lot going on with Python within data science.

3. Function Decorators Allow Enhanced Functionality
Function decorators allow you to enhance the functionality of existing functions. In context of design patterns, decorators dynamically alter the functionality of a function, method or class without having to directly use subclasses. You can implement the decorator pattern anywhere, but Python facilitates the implementation by providing much more expressive features and syntax for that.

4.Machine Learning

machine-learning-python


Machine learning is a type of artificial intelligence (AI) that provides computers with the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed. Machine learning focuses on the development of computer programs that can change when exposed to new data. 
Python has a great library called scikit-learn that is specialized in machine learning. The availability of scikit-learn makes it easy to implement machine learning algorithms in python.

5.Browser Automation

browser-automation-python


You can also use Python to do cool things like automating your browser to do social media posts,download files and web pages. This can be done by using Selenium with Python. Selenium is able to fill in forms and simulate mouse clicks in this browser.

6.Robotics

robotics-python

Python is a core language of ROS (Robot Operating System), meaning the full power of a distributed robotics system and all its libraries/tools are available to you via Python. Python can be used to code a Raspberry Pi to function as the brain of a robot. By doing this you can get the robot to react to its environment and perform multiple actions.

These six cool things made possible by this programming language is just a fraction of what you can do with it. Python’s recent 3.6 release has new features in the asyncio module (which is no longer provisional with a surprisingly stable API), formatted string literals, and the addition of a file system path protocol.
The language is also evolving fast within the data science space. The Python ecosystem is now full of data science tools, so a lot of the data science work that’s currently taking place is being done with open-source tools like Python.

Learn Python with Django

Installing Adobe After Effects

Adobe After Effects Installation
About Adobe After Effects :

Adobe After Effects is a digital visual effects, motion graphics, and compositing application developed by Adobe Systems and used in the post-production process of film making and television production. Among other things, After Effects can be used for keying, tracking, compositing and animation. It also functions as a very basic non-linear editor, audio editor and media transcoder.


After Effects CC (2015) system requirements :


Windows :


Intel Core2 Duo or AMD Phenom II processor with 64-bit support
Microsoft Windows 7 with Service Pack 1, Windows 8, or Windows 8.1
8 GB of RAM (16 GB recommended)
5 GB of available hard-disk space; additional free space required during installation (cannot install on removable flash storage devices)
Additional disk space for disk cache (10 GB recommended)
1280 x 1080 display
OpenGL 2.0-capable system
QuickTime 7.6.6 software required for QuickTime features
Optional: Adobe-certified GPU card for GPU-accelerated ray-traced 3D renderer
Internet connection and registration are necessary for required software activation, validation of subscriptions, and access to online services.

Mac OS :

Multicore Intel processor with 64-bit support
macOS v10.9 (Mavericks), or v10.10 (Yosemite)
8 GB of RAM (16 GB recommended)
5 GB of available hard-disk space for installation; additional free space required during installation (cannot install on a volume that uses a case-sensitive file system or on removable flash storage devices)
Additional disk space for disk cache (10 GB recommended)
1440 x 900 display
OpenGL 2.0-capable system
QuickTime 7.6.6 software required for QuickTime features
Optional: Adobe-certified GPU card for GPU-accelerated ray-traced 3D renderer
Internet connection and registration are necessary for required software activation, validation of subscriptions, and access to online services.

Installing a render-only instance of Adobe After Effects CC
Before you start:
1. If you have installed Creative Cloud applications on two computers, sign out of one of them by opening any of the applications and choosing Sign Out from the Help menu.

2. You can sign back into Creative Cloud on this computer after the render-only instances of After Effects are installed.

To install a render-only instance of After Effects CC, do the following:
1. Go to the product page to download and install After Effects CC.
2. Download Adobe After Effects CC Trial from :
    https://www.adobe.com/products/aftereffects/free-trial-download.html
3. Install as Try.
4. When the installation is complete, start After Effects.
5. Quit After Effects install Application.
6. To start the application browse to Start Menu > All Programs > Adobe After Effects CC 2015.exe
Limitations of the trial version
The trial version of After Effects includes all of the codecs that are included with the full version of After Effects. This means that you can import and export to all of the supported file formats using the trial version. 
The trial version of After Effects also includes the Keylight plug-in, mocha-AE, mocha shape, Cycore (CC) effects, and Color Finesse. 
Activate the software

A single-user retail license activation supports two computers. For example, you can install the software on a desktop computer at work and on a laptop computer at home.

For more information on product licensing and activation, go to the Adobe website.

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Who Said It: A Republican Congressman or a Classic Christmas Villain? Take the Quiz

Can you tell the difference between Paul Ryan and Ebenezer Scrooge?

There’s something familiar about the way the GOP talks about the poor. If you’ve been paying close attention to Republicans in the House and Senate, they may strike you as being eerily reminiscent of other curmudgeons we normally hear from this time of year—infamous villains like Ebenezer Scrooge from Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.” Between defenses of their ruthless attempts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act and their ludicrous justifications for passing a bill that slashes taxes for the rich while hiking costs for the poor and middle classes, Republican politicians are sounding more and more like the grumpy, selfish antagonists from our favorite stories of the season.

Don’t believe it? Take this quiz to see if you can tell the difference between real people and fictional characters. Check your answers at the bottom.

When it comes to the poor, Mitch McConnell’s views are virtually the same as Mr. Potter’s from “It’s a Wonderful Life.”

Photo Credit: Liberty Films (Potter, left); Wikimedia Commons (McConnell, right)

1. “I am an old man and most people hate me. But I don’t like them either, so that makes it all even.”

a) Mitch McConnell

b) Orrin Hatch

c) Mr. Potter (It’s a Wonderful Life

2. “We don’t want to turn the safety net into a hammock that lulls able-bodied people into complacency and dependence.”

a) Paul Ryan

b) Ebenezer Scrooge

c) Mitch McConnell

3. “Are you running a business or a charity ward? Not with my money!”

a) Paul Ryan

b) Mr. Potter

c) Sen. Chuck Grassley

4. “I think not having the estate tax recognizes the people that are investing as opposed to those that are just spending every darn penny they have, whether it’s on booze or women or movies.”

a) Sen. Chuck Grassley

b) The Grinch

c) Mr. Potter

5. “Oh, bleeding hearts of the world, unite!”

a) The Grinch

b) Ebenezer Scrooge

c) Orrin Hatch

6. “Are there no prisons? And the union workhouses, are they still in operation? Those who are badly off must go there.”

a) Mitch McConnell

b) Ebenezer Scrooge

c) The Grinch

7. “I have a rough time wanting to spend billions and billions and trillions of dollars to help people who won’t help themselves, won’t lift a finger, and expect the federal government to do everything.”

a) Mr. Potter

b) Paul Ryan

c) Orrin Hatch

8. “Those people who lead good lives, they’re healthy, they’ve done the things to keep their bodies healthy. And right now, those are the people who have done things the right way that are seeing their costs skyrocketing.”

a) Mr. Potter

b) Mo Brooks, Alabama congressman

c) Ebenezer Scrooge

9. “We have got this tailspin of culture, in our inner cities in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning to value the culture of work, so there is a real culture problem here that has to be dealt with.”

a) The Grinch

b) Ebenezer Scrooge

c) Paul Ryan 

10. “Uh-huh. You see, if you shoot pool with some employee here, you can come and borrow money. What does that get us? A discontented, lazy rabble instead of a thrifty working class.”

a) Chuck Grassley

b) Paul Ryan

c) Mr. Potter 

Key: 1:C, 2:A, 3:B, 4:A, 5:A, 6:B, 7:C, 8:B, 9:C, 10:C

Android LinkedIn Integration: Android – LeaVe my baThRoom at-least !

LinkedIn is a business and employment-oriented social networking service that operates via websites and mobile apps. It is mainly used for professional networking, including employers posting jobs and job seekers posting their curriculum vitae. LinkedIn allows members (both workers and employers) to create profiles and “connections” to each other in an online social network which may represent real-world professional relationships. It presents curriculum vitae of the individual which can be browsed by recruiters.

Android LinkedIn Integration

Android allow applications to connect to LinkedIn and share data or any kind of updates on LinkedIn.
Following are the ways through which you can integrate LinkedIn in application

  • LinkedIn SDK(Scribe)
  • Intent Share

1. LinkedIn SDK(Scribe)

The mobile SDK for Android increases your app’s time to market by providing out-of-box support for LinkedIn natively inside your Android applications. This allows you to boost your sign in conversion rates and provides you more time to work on the things that matter.

The SDK provides:
Single sign-on (SSO) authentication, in conjunction with the LinkedIn mobile app.
A convenient wrapper for making authenticated calls to LinkedIn’s REST APIs.
Deep linking” to additional member data in the LinkedIn mobile app.

Follow steps to integrate LinkedIn SDK 

Creating a new app in LinkedIn Developer account
Create a new LinkedIn application at https://www.linkedin.com/developer/apps. Click on Create new Application and follow the setup.
 create LinkedIn developer app
Fill following form
 create LinkedIn developer app form

 you will get Application ID for your Application

Create new Android Project
Open AndroidManifest.xml file and include the following code given below:
<uses-permission android:name=”android.permission.INTERNET” />
Download Mobile LinkedIn SDK 
Go to https://developer.linkedin.com/docs/android-sdk  and download a Mobile SDK for Android.
Unzip the file and add LinkedIn-sdk folder in your project.
Add Mobile LinkedIn SDK in project
Open setting.gradle file in your project and include linkedin-sdk folder in your project.
include ‘:app’,’:linkedin-sdk
Adding library in depencencies
Add the following code in the file’s (/app/build.gradle file) dependencies to compile linkedin-sdk
compile project(‘:linkedin-sdk’)
compile ‘com.squareup.picasso:picasso:2.5.2’
compile ‘de.hdodenhof:circleimageview:1.3.0’
Synchronize your project
Generate hash Key
We need to generate a hash key. This generated Hash key will integrate your app with LinkedIn account.
Adding hash key in your LinkedIn Developer account
Go to https://www.linkedin.com/developer/apps  select your application name and click the Mobile tab. Add the package name and generated hash key in your LinkedIn Application. This hash key will authenticate your mobile application.
LinkedIn developer app hash key
Once everything is complete, you can run the Linkedin sample application

2. Intent Share

An android share intent allow your app to share contents such as URL or text and Image to other apps installed in your Android device like Facebook, Twitter, Messaging, Instagram, whatsapp, etc.

 Android provides intent library to share data between activities and applications. In order to use it as share intent , we have to specify the type of the share intent to ACTION_SEND. Its syntax is given below

Intent shareIntent = new Intent();
shareIntent.setAction(Intent.ACTION_SEND);

Next thing you need to is to define the type of data to pass , and then pass the data. Its syntax is given below 

shareIntent.setType("text/plain");
shareIntent.putExtra(Intent.EXTRA_TEXT, " From Suven Consultency");
startActivity(Intent.createChooser(shareIntent, "Hello!!!!"));
Example
here is an example to share data on Linkedin using intent share.
  • You will use Android studio to create an Android application under a package net.suven.android.android_linkedinintegration.
  • Modify src/MainActivity.java file to add necessary code.
  • Modify the res/layout/activity_main to add respective XML components.
  • Run the application and choose a running android device and install the application on it and verify the results.
MainActivity.java
package net.suven.android.android_linkedinintegration;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.net.Uri;
import android.os.Bundle;

import android.support.v7.app.AppCompatActivity;
import android.view.View;
import android.widget.Button;
import android.widget.ImageView;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.io.InputStream;

public class MainActivity extends AppCompatActivity {
private ImageView img;

protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

img = (ImageView) findViewById(R.id.imageView);
Button b1 = (Button) findViewById(R.id.button);

b1.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
@Override
public void onClick(View v) {
Intent sharingIntent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_SEND);
Uri screenshotUri = Uri.parse("android.
resource://net.suven.android.android_linkedinintegration/*");

try {
InputStream stream = getContentResolver().openInputStream(screenshotUri);
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
}

sharingIntent.setType("suvenlogo/jpeg");
sharingIntent.putExtra(Intent.EXTRA_STREAM, screenshotUri);
startActivity(Intent.createChooser(sharingIntent, "Share image using"));
}
});
}
}
activity_main
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout
xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
android:layout_width="match_parent"
android:layout_height="match_parent"
android:paddingLeft="@dimen/activity_horizontal_margin"
android:paddingRight="@dimen/activity_horizontal_margin"
android:paddingTop="@dimen/activity_vertical_margin"
android:paddingBottom="@dimen/activity_vertical_margin"
tools:context=".MainActivity">

<TextView
android:layout_width="wrap_content"
android:layout_height="wrap_content"
android:id="@+id/textView"
android:layout_alignParentTop="true"
android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
android:textSize="30dp"
android:text="Linkedin Share" />

<TextView
android:layout_width="wrap_content"
android:layout_height="wrap_content"
android:text="Tutorials Point"
android:id="@+id/textView2"
android:layout_below="@+id/textView"
android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
android:textSize="35dp"
android:textColor="#ff16ff01" />

<ImageView
android:layout_width="wrap_content"
android:layout_height="wrap_content"
android:id="@+id/imageView"
android:layout_below="@+id/textView2"
android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
android:src="@drawable/logo"/>

<Button
android:layout_width="wrap_content"
android:layout_height="wrap_content"
android:text="Share"
android:id="@+id/button"
android:layout_marginTop="61dp"
android:layout_below="@+id/imageView"
android:layout_centerHorizontal="true" />

</RelativeLayout>

Following is the output of application.

android linkedin integration app
Click on share button. you will see list of share provider
share post
Now select LinkedIn from the list and then write your message shown in following image 

write linkedin post


Click here to download Source Code and APK

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3D printing larger objects

Since I bought my 3D printer I have printed hundreds of miniatures for my Dungeons & Dragons game. The miniatures are in a classic 1 inch = 5 feet that is 1:60 scale. So a typical medium sized miniature has a 25 mm base and is around 28 mm tall. As I have written earlier, the main problem of printing objects that size is that printing anything less than 1 mm thick tends to fail, so I had to “fatten” some miniatures or give them oversized weapons to work. Now that I have a good selection of miniatures, I am more often printing larger objects, and the challenges are different.

Now “larger objects” on my 3D printer are limited to 150 mm in any dimension due to the size of the printer itself. Over the last month I printed several objects that were at or close to that limit: Two dice towers, a hinged box, a card tray and two card holders for the 7th Continent, and JoyCon holders for the Nintendo Switch. Apart from the box, which was more of a tech demo to show that you can print a hinged object in one piece, the other objects would be either hard to get anywhere, or be much more expensive. Thus there is some utility to printing these larger objects yourself. The 3D printer also automatically makes items hollow, filled with some honeycomb structure, so a bulky 3D printed object is quite lightweight.

While with larger objects there are no more problems with too thin parts, the main downside of these objects is that the uneven surface is far more prominent. If you are used to holding plastic items in your hand which have a smooth and shiny surface, the 3D printed objects are notably different. Along the Z-axis the layer structure is very visible. And on inner surfaces where the printer had to move across empty space to get to the other side of the object there are irregular imperfections. To some extent you can clean the object up using a sanding sponge. But unless you want to spend hours sanding the object will never be totally smooth and shiny like a commercial injection-molded item.

I still don’t believe in a future where we all just 3D print everything we need instead of buying mass-produced items. However there are a few niche applications where a 3D printer can produce a larger object of some use.